The National Association of Manufacturers (NAM) has released a study entitled “Economic Outcomes of a U.S. Carbon Tax”.

http://www.nam.org/~/media/ECF11DF347094E0DA8AF7BD9A696ABDB.ashx

From the executive summary.

During the ongoing debate on how to address our nation’s fiscal challenges, some have suggested
that imposing a carbon tax would improve the U.S. economy at the same time it reduces carbon
emissions. A new study released by the National Association of Manufacturers (NAM), Economic
Outcomes of a U.S. Carbon Tax,1 models two carbon tax cases (a $20/ton case and an 80 percent
reduction case) across 2013–2053 and concludes that the net effects on the U.S. economy would
be negative. Specific findings based on these two carbon tax cases include the following:
Any revenue raised by a carbon tax—under both carbon tax cases—would be far outweighed by
t he negative impacts to the overall economy.
A carbon tax would have a net negative effect on consumption, investment and jobs, resulting in
lower federal revenues from taxes on capital and labor.
Factoring in lost revenue from reduced economic activity, the net revenue from a carbon tax
available for deficit/debt reduction and lower tax rates is relatively small.
The increased costs of coal, natural gas and petroleum products due to a carbon tax would
ripple through the economy and result in higher production costs and less spending on nonenergy
goods.
A carbon tax would lead to lower real wage rates because companies would have higher costs
and lower labor productivity. Over time, workers’ incomes could decline relative to baseline levels
by as much as 8.5 percent in the 80 percent reduction case.
The negative impact of a carbon tax on total manufacturing output would be significant, with
output from energy-intensive manufacturing sectors dropping as much as 15.0 percent and
output from non-energy-intensive manufacturing sectors dropping as much as 7.7 percent.

Obama can’t be re-elected again. He’ll soon have his new rubber stamp running the EPA. The conclusion of the study is nothing good, but that won’t stop Obama from pushing to get it done.

The carbon tax cases modeled in this study would have net negative effects on consumption,
investment and overall economic activity. Moreover, taking into account the lost revenue from less
economic activity, the net revenue from a carbon tax available for deficit/debt reduction and lower tax
rates is relatively small.
At the same time, the increased costs of coal, natural gas and petroleum products due to a carbon
tax would ripple through the economy and result in higher production costs and less spending
on non-energy goods. For workers, a carbon tax would lead to lower real wage rates because
companies would have higher costs and lower labor productivity. Over time, workers’ incomes could
decline relative to baseline levels by as much as 8.5 percent.
For manufacturers, the net negative impact of a carbon tax on manufacturing output would be
significant. Relative to baseline levels, output from energy-intensive manufacturing sectors could
decline as much as 15.0 percent, and output from non-energy-intensive manufacturing sectors could
decrease as much as 7.7 percent.
Overall, the net impact of a carbon tax would be negative, as the adverse effects of the imposition of
such a tax would outweigh any benefits, including the reduction of the deficit/debt and lower personal
income tax rates.

You can to their website here to see a state-by-state impact.

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